Marketing on Social Networking Sites

Social network marketing can be noble, valuable and highly engaging, despite the best efforts of some get-rich-quick-but-doomed-to-fail wannabes to represent themselves as the devil’s personal spambot. Don’t confuse these idiots with genuine marketing. Social network marketing is popularly called as Internet marketing. Today on the internet you can find many ways market your products and services online. The internet attracts many business people to promote their businesses and products online. Social network marketing provides tons of benefits using the dialogues and personal connections in order to promote different kinds of businesses. Today’s commonly used marketing services include Facebook, MySpace, Twitter, and many others that readily spread word or marketing messages like a viral infection.

Social network marketing creates awareness of products and services of respective websites with a well set strategic marketing approach along with search engine marketing for increased page rank, link popularity and more visitors to you. Social network marketing is all about getting your website known to the worldwide web by means of target keywords that help in creating a social network that shows interest in products and services offered by your website and acts as driving force in getting more business to you. Social network marketing uses the rules of social media optimization to improve your visibility on the web. SMO bridges the gap between search marketing and social media, allowing your website promotion plan to benefit from the best of both. Social network marketing is something that can be a very strong asset for anyone that is looking to make money online. Facebook and Twitter marketing are great weapons.

Social network marketing or social media marketing is all about reaching target audience through social networks or online communities. The methods range from placing ads to building niche content, focused around the promoted product or service. Social network marketing is the process of promoting your website and brand through the vast online world of social network platforms such as MySpace, Facebook, and Twitter. The goal is to directly reach your targeted audience as well as to gain a new audience, and to have them spread the word to the masses via social networks. Social network marketing is an online tool of marketing which helps in the marketing of any product or thing. With the advancement in technology important tools like Internet and other similar technologies took the initiative to develop the networking.

Facebook is now valued at $15 billion after Microsoft bought a 1.6% stake for $240 million, and a lot that seems to be related, not only to Facebook’s large audience, but also the promise it holds for advertisers. The Facebook-Microsoft partnership will draw even more attention to the cultural phenomenon called social networking. Facebook alone has over 400 million active users. This makes social networking the perfect place to market a business. Facebook, Bebo, MySpace, Digg, Flickr, Wikipedia and StumbleUpon have become household names and are visited by millions of Internet users, young and old each day. Is your brand being talked about on any of these networks?

Facebook, for example, is amongst the world’s most popular social networks and, according to Facebook?s own statistics has about 150 million active users (Inside Facebook states there are about 140 million users). An average user shares their profile with about 100 friends, is about 25 years old (or older) and 70% probably live outside the United States. Facebook is just one of many social networks undergoing comparable demographic shifts. We’re living in an age where social networking and social media destinations site are big business and are easily as recognizable as major portals of five years ago. Facebook is more that social networking tools. It’s also a platform that allow us to spread the messages to friends.

Facebook membership grew only 9% in North America, compared to 25% elsewhere according to comScore. Europe is especially on a roll, with 35 million users, a 303% increase from the year before.

Twitter, now well over 6 million members, has a growth rate of 4 times that of Facebook and every single minute, ten hours of video is uploaded to YouTube. Twitter, Facebook, and the like are sources of endless hype for marketing consultancy groups. They are “packed with potential,” “incredible for businesses,” and “unbeatable” for ROI, or at least they are if people focus on the hype and discussion surrounding it.

Internet marketing companies can use their experience and can effectively include social media marketing in their marketing campaign. The can also provide branding services and reputation management services. Internet marketers the world over are scrambling to create followers so they can market their wares using this fresh, new interface.

Death and Social Networks

Losing a friend or family member is painful enough, but imagine when that friend’s social networking profile at Facebook, Twitter, and MySpace continues to appear on your personal wall or in searches.

In the digital age, many of us publish our entire lives through profiles, status updates, networks, photographs, blog posts, etc. With more than a million social networkers dying yearly, family, friends and service providers are stuck trying to figure out how to deal with a deceased user’s digital bits.

As a social networking guru with over 40,000 contacts spread across six social networks, one of them – Barry Epstein, of Boca Raton – advised that he was closing the accounts of his recently departed son. Aware of the “memorial” policies of Facebook, I was prompted to investigate the various social networking policies on deceased users’ accounts and what can be done to preserve, memorialize or delete them following death.

Facebook

Although not the first to establish a policy for its 500 million users worldwide, Facebook was the highest profile because of the way it addressed the issue. Rather than allowing a family member to take control of an account, Facebook instead decided to take things a step further and allowed them to be memorialized.

This is helpful for two reasons. First, it preserves the deceased user’s online identity so that only confirmed friends can visit their profile to read about them, view photos and leave posts of remembrance.

When Facebook converts an account into a memorial, the deceased user no longer pops up in Facebook’s friend suggestions. Thus we are not constantly reminded of their disappearance. The person’s profile automatically becomes private to everyone but confirmed friends. Personal identifiers and contact information are also removed to respect privacy and prevent hacking.

To establish a Facebook memorial, family or friends fill out a special contact form and provide proof of death such as an Internet link to an obituary or news article. Unlike other social networks, Facebook allows non-family to perform this task, which is helpful in a situation where the deceased user’s friends are more Internet-savvy than family – facebook.com/help/?search=deceased

Twitter

Just as Facebook allows users to request an account be deleted or memorialized when a friend or family member has passed on, Twitter users can now request a permanent back-up of the deceased user’s public tweets or a complete account deletion – twitter.com/help

Accounts of deceased users will no longer appear in the “Who to Follow” suggestion box and previously scheduled tweets are not published. At present, accounts of deceased users look exactly the same as those of living users and can be followed and listed.

To establish a permanent back-up or to delete a deceased user’s Twitter account, a family member is required to submit the user name or link to the profile page, and proof of death in the form of a public obituary or news article. Twitter also advises, “Please note that we cannot allow access to the account or disclose other non-public information regarding the account.”

MySpace

As one of the oldest social networks, MySpace has a deceased user policy that is more of a standardized policy of removal rather than memorializing. Moreover, MySpace does not adequately address privacy concerns and is susceptible to hacking – myspace.com/help.

To remove a MySpace profile, a family member must contact MySpace via e-mail with proof of death and the user’s unique identification number. A user-name is generally not acceptable.

“Unfortunately, we can’t let you access, edit, or delete any of the content or settings on the user’s profile yourself, but we’ll be sure to review and remove any content you find objectionable,” reads MySpace’s policy. This policy is not particularly helpful for older relatives that are not Internet-savvy and makes it almost impossible to remove a deceased user’s existence from MySpace.

Strangely enough, hackers can potentially access the deceased user’s account. On MySpace’s policy page is an admission admitting that anyone with access to their e-mail account can simply “retrieve the password through the forgot password link” and make any necessary changes.

“I believe social networks are really useful for memorializing the deceased,” stated Barry Epstein of Boca Raton. “No matter what one does at the memorial service, people are using social networks as a way to deal with the departed, but in a way that funerals don’t allow.”

Source: The Credit Report with Bill Lewis – Highlands Today, an edition of the Tampa Tribune – Media General Group http://www2.highlandstoday.com/content/2010/dec/12/death-and-social-networks/news/

Social Networking: Facebook – Adding Friends

Facebook For Internet Marketing Newbies!

My first tip for you is to use a separate Facebook account for running your business. Whilst it’s nice to show everyone you have a human side, like to have fun and indulge in a bit of banter, it’s for the best to maintain a professional approach to your marketing. You don’t have to be a marketing robot but people who are interested in your business will be more likely to respond to something you’ve posted relating to internet marketing rather than a post about taking your dog for a walk!

My second tip is to use a good picture for your profile and use your real name. You can go for the standard business attire like a suit or something smart casual. Either way, looking professional is a good idea. There’s nothing overly wrong with looking like you’re having fun but pulling a stupid face or holding a can of beer could possibly give people a different impression to the one you’re trying to make. Also, focus on your face and make sure it’s clear to see. People always like to put faces to names and vice versa.

Adding Friends

To build up relationships and help put your name out there look to add around 25 targeted friends per day. ‘Targeted’ means relevant to you and your business. You’re wasting your time if you add somebody who has no interest in what you do. Find people interested in Internet Marketing. Search through group pages on ‘Making Money Online’ etc because these are the people that have an active interest in what you do and a friendship will be formed easily.

Because you’ll start your account with zero friends you need to make sure you don’t look like somebody who randomly adds because Facebook frowns upon that and could ban you. To start with add people you already know within the industry (your mentor etc) and then go for the people who they are already friends with. These people will see you know the said person and will almost certainly accept your request.

DO NOT ADD 25 IN A ROW!

Spread out these requests through out the day as Facebook will cotton on to your multiple adds and ask you not to send the request if you don’t know the person. You’ll end up with warnings and possibly a ban. 25 per day, week in week out is perfectly safe. You’ll soon notice that once you’ve built up a friend list of over 500 people, you’ll end up getting more and more requests from like-minded people and your list will explode.

I have over 2,200 friends. When I first started I was adding 25 a day and hitting my targets. Within a couple of months people were adding me. Sometimes I would log in after a couple of days of not checking my adds and have 50 plus requests. One time, after a mini-holiday I came back to 78 requests!

Tip:

To begin with put a nice message in with your request to each person. Something like “Hi, I’ve seen your profile and think it would be great if you would accept my friend request. I’m looking to meet and network with like-minded people to share values and opinions. Thanks.” Anything like this will do, although most people understand that gaining a friend is always worthwhile for many reasons so I’ve personally found that after you’ve built up a decent friend list a simple add will do just fine.

Stay tuned for more Facebook tips…